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How Craps Works

An Example of Basic Play

First
find a table and check the minimum bet to make sure it’s in your budget. Lay your money on the table and the dealer will exchange it for chips — you don’t even have to ask. (The dealer won’t cash your chips in
though. You have to go to the cashier for that.)
Players take turns rolling the dice. If someone is rolling when you walk up to the table
you have to wait until the next “come out” roll before you can place your bet. As soon as a shooter sevens out (rolls a seven after a point has been established)
the next player becomes the shooter. To place a Pass Line bet
you put your bet on the Pass Line before the shooter rolls his come out roll. Let’s say you bet $5 (a “nickel” in betting lingo).
The shooter starts off hot and rolls a 7 right off the bat. You just doubled your money and now have $10. You can either take your winnings and keep your original bet on the table or else let it ride and double your bet (called pressing your bet ). You decide to press your bet.

Rule Once a point is established
you can’t pick up your bet — you have to wait until the player sevens out.

Now the shooter rolls an 8
so 8 becomes the point. Remember
you want to see another 8 before you see a 7. The dealer places a white puck called a marker puck on the number 8 in the Place Bets section of the table to mark the point. (When the black side of the puck is showing
no point has been established.)
The next roll is a 3
then a 5
and finally an 8 the hard way (two fours). You’ve just doubled your money again. Now you can either pick up your bet or place another one for the next roll. That’s all there is to the most basic craps game.

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Craps Place Bets

The passline bet with odds is the best craps bet you can make because it has the lowest house edge but players are not limited to just the passline bet. A player can bet on the numbers 4
5
6
8
9
or 10 at any time. There is a row of boxes on the craps layouts with the numbers with the corresponding numbers. These are where the place bets go. The numbers that you can place are sometimes referred to as point numbers or box numbers. You can make a wager on any of these numbers at any time. Place bets can be great if you have a shooter who is rolling repeating numbers.
How to Make Place Bets
To make a place bet you put your chips in the center of the table and tell the dealer which numbers you want to place. The dealer will then move your chips to the number you want to bet. Place bets are not self service bets.
The dealer puts your place bet on the layout in a place that corresponds to the location of the table where you are standing. This is how the dealer knows who to pay for the winning bet when there are multiple players placing the same number.
Winning Your Bet
After you place a number it must roll before the seven in order to win. If the shooter sevens out before your number is rolled you lose. When you win a place bet the dealer will push you your winnings but the original bet stays up. You must pick these up.
Your original bet will stay on the place number until the shooter sevens out or until you ask the dealer to take your bet down. You can also take down your place bets any time you want to. If the shooter makes his point and there is a new come out roll your place bet still stays in place although in many casinos the place bets are not working on the come out roll unless you ask.
The Pay Out
The chart below shows the payoff
the true odds and the house edge for each of the pace bets.
The true odds of rolling the 6 or 8 are 6 to 5 but a winning place bet on these numbers pays $7 to $6. You must make your place bets on these numbers in multiples of six dollars. The house edge on the 6 and 8 is only 1.52 percent which makes it one of the best craps bets in the game.
The true odds of rolling a 5 or 9 are 3 to 2 but a winning place bet on these numbers pays $7 to $5. You must make your place bets in multiples of five dollars. The house edge on the 5 and 9 is 4 percent.
The true odds of rolling the 4 or 10 are 2 to 1 but a winning place bet on these numbers pays $9 to $5. You must make your place bets in multiples of five dollars. The house edge on the 4 and 10 is 6.67 percent.
Buy Bets
You can buy a number instead of placing it and receive true odds. To do this you must pay a 5 % commission to the house. Since the minimum chip value at the casino is a dollar you will be paying at least that much. It is not worth it to buy a number for less than $20.
If you are betting more than ten dollars
buying the 4 and 10 is better than placing them. This is because you are being paid 2 to 1 instead of 9 to 5. Some casinos only charge you the commission on buy bets when you win. Ask the dealer at the table if this is their policy. If you have a choice of casinos to play in
always choose the one that only charges a commission on winning bets.
Buying the 6 and 8 is not worthwhile. You will actually have higher house edge because of the commission.
Place Bets

Number Payoff True Odds House Edge
4 9-5 2-1 6.67%
5 7-5 3-2 4.0%
6 7-6 6-5 1.52%
8 7-6 6-5 1.52%
9 7-5 3-2 4.0%
10 9-5 2-1 6.67%

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Roulette Rules

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Four Card Poker: Rules And Strategy

Four card poker is a new casino poker variation. Like Caribbean poker
pai gow poker and three card poker
the game takes place between each player and the dealer. Four card poker is similar to three card poker. The object of the game is to beat the dealers four card hand by forming the best four card hand as possible. Like in three card poker
there is an option of placing an additional bet
which pays out according to a pay table
regardless of the dealer’s hand.

Rules of Four Card Poker:
This poker game is played with a standard 52 card deck. The game is played on a table about the same size of a blackjack table with three circles in front of each player seat: Aces Up
Ante and 1x to 3x Ante. Each circle signals one of the betting options available in the game.
The game begins with each of the players decides whether to place a bet on the Ante circle
the Aces up circle or both. A player who chooses to play both games is required to place bets in even amounts in both circles.
The dealer deals each player five face down card from which the players choose the best four cards to form the highest possible four card poker hand
according to the hand ranking listed below. The dealer deals himself five face down cards and one face up card. As opposed to three card poker
in four card poker the dealers hand does not have to qualify.
After the cards are dealt
each player looks at his cards and can decide whether to fold or raise. A player who chooses to fold
loses both of his bets. A player who chooses to raise
has to raise to at least the same amount of the Ante bet and up to three times the Ante. After all the players have made their decisions
the dealer exposes his cards and chooses the four of the best cards out of six.
If the dealers hand is higher than the players hand
the player loses all his bets. If the players hand is higher than the dealers hand or equal
he is paid 1:1. If a players hand value is three of a kind or better
he will be entitled to a bonus payout based on a paytable regardless to the value of the dealers hand. The bonus paytable can vary from one casino to another. Usually
the highest possible hand
four of a kind
pays 25:1.
Hand Ranking:
Four card poker hand ranking is obviously different from traditional poker since only four cards are used. Here is the ranking of the hands in four card poker listed from the highest possible four card poker hand to the lowest.
1) Four of a kind
2) Straight flush: four following cards same suited
3) Three of a kind
4) Flush: four same suited cards
5) Straight: four following cards
6) Two pairs
7) Pair of Aces
Aces Up: A New Wager
Aces Up is the additional bet available in four cards poker. It is the equivalent of Pair Plus in three card poker. The payout Aces Up bet is determined by a paytable that regards only to the players hand.
Aces Up Paytable:
1) Four of a kind: 50 to 1
2) Straight flush: 40 to 1
3) Three of a kind: 9 to 1
4) Flush: 6 to 1
5) Straight: 4 to 1
6) Two pair: 2 to 1
7) Pair of Aces 1 to 1
3 Tips for Winning:
This 4-card version like three card poker is a simple game. If you want to adjust a basic strategy that will improve your odds
here are three simple guidelines.
1) Fold if you have less than a pair of 2s.
2) Raise to 1xAnte if you have a pair of 3s
4s
5s
6s
7s
8s
or 9s.
3) If you have pair of 10s or better
raise up to 3xAnte.

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Blackjack Etiquette and Strategy


There’s more to mastering any game than a fundamental understanding of how to play. You must also know the customs of the game and how to finnesse the rules.
Etiquette
When you sit down at a table
wait for the dealer to finish the hand in progress. Then you may buy chips by placing currency on the layout
pushing it toward the dealer
and saying
“Change
please.”
Do not leave currency in the betting box on the table. In most newer gaming jurisdictions
casinos are not allowed to accept cash bets. However
casinos in some places allow cash bets with the call “Money plays.” Don’t leave the dealer wondering if that $100 bill is a request for change or a bet on the next hand.
Once you make a bet
keep your hands off the chips in the betting box until the hand is over.
If you are betting chips of different denominations
stack them with the smallest denomination on top. If you put a larger denomination on top
the dealer will rearrange them before going on with the hand. It’s one way the casino guards against someone attempting to add a large-denomination chip to their bet after the outcome is known.
In multiple-deck games
give playing decisions with hand signals. In single- or double-deck games dealt facedown
pick up the cards with one hand
scratch the table with the cards for a hit
and slide the cards under your chips to stand. Turn the cards faceup if you bust or if you wish to split pairs or double down. At the conclusion of play
let the dealer turn faceup any cards under your chips.
If you are a novice
you might want to avoid the last seat at the table
the one all the way to the players’ left. This is called “third base
” and the player here is the last to play before the dealer. Although in the long run bad plays will help other players as much as they hurt them
in the short term other players will notice if a mistake by the third baseman costs them money. For example
the dealer shows a 6
the third baseman has 12 and hits a 10 to bust. The dealer turns up a 10 for 16
then draws a 5 for 21
beating all players at the table. The third baseman is likely to take heat from other players for taking the dealer’s bust card instead of standing. If you don’t want the heat
sit elsewhere.
If you wish to use the rest room and return to the same seat
you may ask the dealer to mark your place. A clear plastic disk will be placed in your betting box as a sign that the seat is occupied.
The House Edge
Because the player hands are completed first
the players have the chance to bust before the dealer plays. And the house wins whenever the player busts
regardless of how the dealer’s hand winds up. That is the entire source of the casino’s advantage in blackjack. Because of this one edge
the casino will win more hands than the player
no matter how expert.
The casino gives back some of this advantage by paying 3-2 on blackjack
allowing players to see one of the dealer’s cards
and by allowing the player to double down and split pairs. To take advantage of these options
the player must learn proper strategy.
Basic Strategy
Played well
blackjack becomes a game of skill in a casino full of games of chance. Studies of millions of computer-generated hands have yielded a strategy for when to hit
when to stand
when to double
when to split. This strategy can take the house edge down to about .5 percent in a six-deck game — and lower in games with fewer decks. In a single-deck game in which the dealer stands on all 17s and the player is allowed to double down after splits
a basic strategy player can even gain an edge of .1 percent over the house. Needless to say
such single-deck games are not commonly dealt.
Compare those percentages with players who adopt a never-bust strategy
standing on all hands of 12 or more so that drawing a 10 will not cause them to lose before the dealer’s hand is played
to players who use dealer’s strategy
always hitting 16 or less and standing on 17 or more. These players face a house edge estimated at 5 percent — about 10 times the edge faced by a basic strategy player.
Basic strategy takes advantage of the player’s opportunity to look at one of the dealer’s cards. You’re not just blindly trying to come as close to 21 as possible. By showing you one card
the dealer allows you to make an educated estimate of the eventual outcome and play your cards accordingly.
One simple way to look at it is to play as if the dealer’s facedown card is a 10. Since 10-value cards (10
jack
queen
king) comprise four of the 13 denominations in the deck
that is the single most likely value of any unseen card. Therefore
if you have 16 and the dealer’s up-card is a 7
you are guessing that the most likely dealer total is 17. The dealer would stand on 17 to beat your 16; therefore
you must hit the 16 to have the best chance to win.
On the other hand
if you have 16 and the dealer’s up-card is a 6
your assumption would be that his total is 16
making the dealer more likely than not to bust on the next card. Therefore
you stand on 16 versus 6.
That’s an oversimplification
of course
but very close to the way the percentages work out when the effect of multiple-card draws are taken into account.
The most common decision a player must make is whether to hit or stand on a hard total — a hand in which there is no ace being used as an 11. Basic strategy begins with the proper plays for each hard total faced by the player. You can refer to this simple chart:

If you have: And dealer shows: Do this:
8 and under Always hit
regardless of the dealer’s up-card
9 3
4
5
or 6
Double down
2 or 7 and above Hit
10 2 through 9 Double down
10 or ace Hit
11 2 through 10 Double down
Ace Hit
12 2
3
or 7 and above
Hit
4 through 6 Stand
13 through 16 7 and above Hit
2 through 6 Stand
17 through 21 Always stand
regardless of the dealer’s up-card

Many players seem to hit the wall at 16 and stand regardless of the dealer’s up-card. But that 16 is a loser unless the dealer busts
and the dealer will make 17 or better nearly 80 percent of the time with a 7 or higher showing. The risk of busting by hitting 16 is outweighed by the likelihood you’ll lose if you stand.
Basic strategy for hard totals is straightforward enough
but when it comes to soft totals many players become confused. They seem lost
like the player aboard a riverboat in Joliet
Illinois
who wanted to stand on ace-5 –a soft 16– against a dealer’s 6. The dealer asked if he was sure
and another player piped in
“You can’t HURT that hand
” so the player finally signaled for a hit. He drew a 5 to total 21 and was all grins.
In a facedown game
no friendly advice is available. Once
at a downtown Las Vegas casino
the dealer busted
meaning all players who hadn’t busted won. One player turned up two aces and a three. “Winner five!” the dealer called out. Though it worked out that time
five (or 15) never wins without the dealer busting
and the player could have drawn at least one more card without busting. That’s too big an edge to give away.
Nothing you could draw could hurt a soft 16
or a soft 15
or many other soft totals. Just as with hard totals
guesswork is unnecessary. A basic strategy tells you to what to do with soft hands.
The hand of ace and 6 is the most misplayed hand in blackjack. People who understand that the dealer always stands on 17 and that the player stands on hard 17 and above seem to think 17 is a good hand
but the dealer must bust for 17 to win. If the dealer does not bust
the best 17 can do is tie. By hitting soft 17
you have a chance to improve it by drawing ace
2
3
or 4
or leave it the same with 10-jack-queen-king. That’s eight of 13 cards that either improve the hand or leave it no worse. And even if the draw is 5
6
7
8
or 9
you have another chance to draw if the dealer shows 7 or better
and you’re still in position to win if the dealer busts while showing 2 through 6
and all you’ve given up is a chance to tie a 17. You can refer to this chart for soft-hand strategies:

If you have: And dealer shows: Do this:
Ace
ace
Split the pair of aces
Ace
2 or ace
3
5 or 6 Double down
All other up-cards Hit
Ace
4 or ace
5
4
5
or 6
Double down
All other up-cards Hit
Ace
6
3 through 6 Double down
All other up-cards Hit
Ace
7
3 through 6 Double down
2
7
or 8
Stand
9
10. or ace
Hit
Ace
8 or ace
9
Always stand
regardless of the dealer’s up-card
Ace
10
Blackjack — smile and take that 3-2 payoff

Standing on soft 18 will lose the player money in the long run when the dealer shows 9
10
or ace. When the dealer shows 3 through 6
the chances of the dealer busting are strong enough to make doubling down the best play here.
The final category of hands consists of those in which the first two cards match. Then the player must decide whether or not to split the pair into two hands. You can refer to this chart for pair splitting advice:

If you have: And dealer shows: Do this:
Ace
ace
Always split.
2
2 or 3
3
4
5
6
or 7
Split
All other up-cards Hit
4
4
Never split. An 8 is a much stronger building block to a hand than a 4.
5
5
2 through 9 Never split — double down
10 or ace Never split — hit
6
6
3
4
5
or 6
Split
All other up-cards Hit
7
7
2 through 7 Split
8 through ace Hit
8
8
Always split.
9
9
2 through 6 Split
7 Stand
8 and 9 Split
10 or ace Stand
10
10
Never split. This hand is too strong.

Some Strategy Variations: Double Down After Splits Permitted
Many casinos allow the player to double down after splitting pairs. This is a good rule for players — in fact
any rule that allows a player an option is a good one if the player knows when to take advantage of the option. If you split 8s against a 6
for example
and a 3 is dealt to your first 8
you now are playing this hand as an 11
and it is to your advantage to double down if the house allows it.
If the casino allows doubling after splits
the following strategy variations are necessary:
If you have 2
2; 3
3: Split against 2 through 7 instead of 4 through 7.
If you have 4
4: Split against 5 and 6 instead of just hitting against all.
If you have 6
6: Split against 2 through 6 instead of 3 through 6.
Single-Deck Blackjack
You can find many single-deck games in Nevada
and they pop up occasionally in other parts of the country. You will need a few variations for single-deck blackjack. Basic strategy is much the same as in the multiple-deck game
with a few twists
given below:
If you have 11: Double down against all dealer up cards.
If you have 9: The difference comes when the dealer shows a 2. In multiple-deck you hit; in single-deck
double down.
If you have 8: Double down against 5 and 6.
If you are holding ace
8: As good as that 19 looks
it is to the player’s advantage to double down against a 6. Stand against all else.
If you are holding ace
7: Stand against an ace
unless you are playing in a casino in which the dealer hits soft 17. In that case
hit.
If you are holding ace
6: Double against 2 through 6.
If you are holding ace
3 or ace
2: Double against 4
5
and 6.
If you are holding 2
2: Where doubling after splits is not allowed
split against 3 through 7 in a single-deck game. Otherwise
follow the same strategy as in multiple-deck games.
If you are holding 3
3: If doubling after splits is permitted
split against 2 through 8.
If you are holding 4
4: If doubling after splits is permitted
split against 4 through 6.
If you are holding 6
6: If doubling after splits is permitted
split against 2 through 7; if not
split against 2 through 6.
If you are holding 7
7: If doubling after splits is permitted
split against 2 through 8. Also
stand against a 10 in the single-deck game.
In our final section
you will learn the most advanced strategy for playing blackjack — counting cards.

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How To Play Omaha Poker

Ohama poker plays the second best in attracting a large amount of people in card games next to Texas Holdem. Ohama Poker is very similar to Texas Holdem
with the main difference being that a player can choose his or her hand out of nine cards instead of seven. This is the reason for the growing popularity of the game.
Omaha
which has the same structure as Texas Holdem
is played very similar to Texas Hold’em; the only difference being that each player is dealt four hole cards instead of two. The players post the blinds and then receive their hole cards. After receiving the hole cards
a betting round takes place and then comes the flop
the turn and the river with a betting round between each of them.
The main difference between Omaha and Texas Hold’em is that each of the players has to form his hand out of precisely two hole cards and three board cards. This is different from Texas Hold’em where a player could use either one or both (or even none) of his hole cards. If a player is trying to win the low hand
he must use two unpaired hole cards that are ranked lower than eight
and three board cards
also unpaired
that are also ranked lower than eight.
In Omaha
the starting hands should be coordinated
which means that they should fit together. What you really want are cards that are more likely to form into straights
flushes or a full house. It’s very rare that a pair would hold up on an Omaha table. Look for double-suited hands
giving you two chances of a flush and cards that are close together or considered in a run.
In playing the game
this is an example where many new Omaha players falter. The players
for instance
see four spades on the board
which are the community cards
and they have the Ace of Spades in their hand. They think they have the nut flush
forgetting that a player must use two hole cards
therefore needing two spades in his hand to make a flush.
Omaha is played either Pot Limit or Limit. The game is not played No Limit
as having four hole cards gives so many extra possibilities
chances
and permutations. If playing No Limit
the game would be too wild and without direction.

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How to Play 7-Card Stud Poker


For many years
7-Card Stud was easily the most-played poker game. Then
in the ’70s
Texas Hold’em arrived
and it has been gaining popularity during the past decade. It wasn’t bad enough that Hold’em became more popular; now Omaha/8 is arguably the second-most-popular poker game.

Don’t let any of this
however
mislead you into thinking that 7-Card Stud is no longer important to the poker world. It is still offered in most fair-size card rooms
at some tournaments
and is often played by many at home. 7-Card Stud is an intricate card game with many details to learn. If you are looking for a way to gain more knowledge about the game
you have found the right article. Let’s get down to basics:
7-Card Stud is played both high only (meaning the highest hand wins) and high-low/hi-lo (meaning that the highest hand splits the winnings with the lowest hand). The discussion in this article will center on the high-only version. 7-Card Stud is also played at both set limit and pot (the pot is the total amount that has been bet in a single game) limit. Set limit means that there’s a preset limit to how much you can bet
and pot limit means that you can bet as much money as there is in the pot at any given time.
Up to eight players may play in a 7-Card Stud game. It is possible that there will not be enough cards if all eight players make it to the end of the game
especially if the dealer burns (discards) a card prior to dealing to the active players. In these infrequent cases
instead of dealing a card to each active player
the dealer turns a “community” card (a card that all active players can use).
Before the deal
each player places an ante into the pot and then receives two down cards (hole cards ) and one face up card. The player with the lowest face up card (an ace is high in this situation) is required to start the betting action with an initial bet called the “bring-in.” The bring-in must be at least the required minimum amount agreed upon before the game. Play continues to the left with either calls (to equal the previous opponent’s bet)
raises (to bet higher than the previous opponent)
or folds (to resign). For example
if a player thought he had a strong hand and good chance of winning the round
he would raise the bet in attempt to generate the largest pot possible.
After all betting is completed
a fourth card is dealt face up to each player who has not folded. From this point on
the player with the highest hand showing starts the action. For example
if the high hand (excluding the hole cards) is a pair after the fourth card is dealt
the player with this pair must check (to decline to bet or to pass when it is your turn to act)
bet
or fold. Because there is no bring-in requirement after the first betting round
players do not need to fold until there is a bet. Once there is a bet
players left in the game
in turn
must call
raise
or fold. It is possible for players to check around the table
thus having a round with no bets.
A fifth card is dealt face up followed by a betting round
and then a sixth card is dealt face up followed by another round of betting. The seventh card is dealt to each player face down
and the final round of betting starts. Each round is often called a “street” (the third card is called third street
the fourth card is called fourth street
and so on through seventh street).

This 7-Card Stud hand could be hiding a flush or a straight.
2006 Publications International
Ltd.
This 7-Card Stud hand could be hiding a flush or a straight.

A skill that is much more important in 7-Card Stud than most other forms of poker is memory. All good 7-Card Stud players remember what cards their opponents were showing before they folded. This is important because players need to know what cards are still out there that can help them and which ones are already gone. Like most forms of poker
other important skills include reading players
reading hands
reading betting patterns
and determining pot odds (the odds of winning the pot) and starting hand selection (which starting hands are worth playing).
The best starting hand is two aces in the hole and an ace showing
followed by other three-of-a-kind hands (often called rolled-up trips ). Next is a high pair in the hole because it is not only a high pair but also a hidden one. High pairs with one card showing
especially if it is the highest card showing
are also strong starting hands. Hands with strong flush and straight possibilities are also reasonable starting hands.
Like all forms of poker
7-Card Stud is a game of information. Always be aware of what cards your opponents have showing and what hands they could possibly have. Sometimes you’ll notice players who are just learning the game calling bets on the last betting round with hands that can’t beat what an opponent has showing. For example
Player A has two aces showing and Player B calls with only a pair of kings. If Player B had simply been paying attention
he/she could have saved at least one bet.

Only by bluffing can the player with kings win.
2006 Publications International
Ltd.
Only by bluffing can the player with kings win.

Just like Hold’em and Omaha
the best 7-Card Stud players are tight and aggressive
and they can read players
hands
and situations. Sometimes poor players can win for long stretches of time in Hold’em because of short-term variance
but poor players in 7-Card Stud usually struggle because of a reduced “luck” factor. Understanding what cards are still available to help your hand and pot odds are of the utmost importance to a successful 7-Card Stud player.

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How To Play Texas Holdem

Texas Holdem isnt just any card game. It ranks king among poker games. It has cleaned out all other competition among card players across the globe. It is a game played in casinos
on television
Online
in basements
garages and kitchens
and everywhere a table can be found with room enough for a few players
some poker chips and a couple decks of cards.
Everyone is learning how to play this exciting game: young people
older people
men
women
professionals
non-professionals and more. It is a way to have fun or make a little or a lot of money.
Heres how:
The game is most commonly played with 2 to 10 players
although it can be played with as many as 22. Like with most poker games
the object is to win the pots
the amount of chips and/or money the players have bet in a hand. This can be accomplished in two ways. Either a player beats the others by having the best five-card poker hand at the end of a showdown
or a player causes the other plays to fold and abandon the pot through aggressive betting and bluffing techniques.
At the beginning of a hand
the two players to the left of the dealer are required to the pay the blinds two forced bets made in games that have a flop. In Texas Holdem
there is normally a small blind and a big blind with pre-determined amounts. These blinds increase as the game moves forward
typically after set periods of time or after a certain number of hands.
In Texas Holdem
a dealer button a certain designated chip is placed in front of the dealer to keep track of the blinds and the dealing schedule. This button rotates clockwise around the table
moving after each hand and changing who has to pay the small and big blinds.
The small blind is posted by the person directly to the left of the dealer and is usually equal to half of the big blind. The big blind is posted by the person to the left of the small blind and is normally equal to the minimum bet at first and then increases along with the minimum bet over the course of play.
Play begins when each player is dealt two cards face down. The cards are called pocket cards and are only revealed in some cases by the players in the showdown. The hand begins with blinds
as well as a pre-flop betting round
beginning with the player to the left of the big blind and continuing clockwise.
Then
assuming not all players have folded and at least two remain in the hand
the dealer places the flop on the table. The flop is made up of three face-up community cards that allow each player to form a five-card poker hand and is followed by a second betting round that begins with the player to the left of the dealer. A single community card
called the turn
is then placed on the table by the dealer and another betting round ensues.
Then
the final community card
called the river
is dealt
followed by another betting round and a showdown
if necessary. If at any time during the hand only one player remains
they collect the pot. However
if two or more players remain when betting ends
the players must compare hands to see who wins.

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Baccarat

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Poker

The origins of playing cards and poker are difficult to pin down. There are dozens of theories. Some say playing cards were developed by the Chinese as a variation on dominoes. In Europe
Tarot decks used for fortune telling are an obvious link in the lineage of the playing card. Gaming has been popular in every culture throughout history
so it is likely that different versions of the playing-card deck were developed independently by different cultures at different times.


Deck of playing cards

Early French settlers who came to New Orleans played a card game called poque
which involved bluffing and betting. Persian sailors
at port in New Orleans
taught the French settlers the Persian game called s
which uses decks of cards comprised of five suits. Most likely
these two games came to be melded together into one
and as travelers spread the game up the Mississippi River
they changed it to suit their own purposes. Con men who plied the riverboats adapted the game
using it to relieve their victims of their “poke
” or cash. At some point
this Anglicized version of the word poque became “poker.” The first written mention of “poker” was in 1834.
In the 1800s
the game quickly spread to the western frontier. The “wild west ” period of American history was a boom time for poker
with a poker table in almost every saloon.
Legendary Las Vegas casino owner Benny Binion decided to host a poker tournament for the best players in the world. In 1970
he held the first ever World Series of Poker . This $10
000 buy-in
no-limit Texas Hold’em game is now televised on ESPN.
Poker Basics
Right now is the best time to be a poker player. In fact
new players are entering into the game every day in large numbers. As more people seek opportunities to play poker
more poker rooms and Web sites are opening up. As a result
the coverage of poker on television and the number of books and amount of information made available increases
which in turn bring more players into the game. This cycle continues to feed itself so that the popularity of poker is now at an all-time high.
This article will cover many of the basics of poker — from rankings of poker hands to the card game’s terminology. But to put everything in its proper context
we’ll lead off with a quick primer on the history of poker.
Poker Origins
Many people were introduced to poker by seeing it played in the saloons in Western movies
and the poker game played was most often 5-Card Draw. Some people may also have heard stories of riverboat gamblers on the Mississippi River. For these reasons
a lot of people grew up believing poker began in America in the 1900s
and the only poker game ever played was 5-Card Draw. Actually
both assumptions are false.
The actual origin of poker is not known. Some say the Chinese played with cards as early as the tenth century a.d. In another part of the world
archaeologists recovered fragments of cardlike items dating to the twelfth or thirteenth century in Egypt. Of course
we don’t know what the Egyptians used these cards for
but it could have been the first form of poker. We do know that in the sixteenth century people in India played a game called Ganjifa
which used a deck of 96 cards; and in the seventeenth century the Persians played a five-player card game
which they called As Nas
using 25 cards in five suits.
The current 52-card deck is often credited to European countries. In the fifteenth century
France introduced the current suits of clubs
diamonds
hearts
and spades in a game called Poque. It is quite possible that the word “poker” is derived from that word. Others
however
claim that the word “poker” comes from the German card game pochspiel or the German game pochen
which dates back to the sixteenth century. Also
the British are credited with the introduction of games called “Brag” and “Faro
” which were played in many saloons in the Old West.
Eventually
poker migrated to the United States in the late eighteenth century and continued to spread throughout North America. Variations of poque called “draw” and “stud” became popular during the Civil War. These terms are still used today.
Next
we’ll move onto the fundamentals of playing the game
specifically the rankings of poker hands.

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